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Noticeboard

Patient Online Services - April 2016

Dyneley House Surgery has offered patients’ facilities to book appointments and order their repeat prescriptions ‘on-line’ since 2011.

From 1 April, we are able to offer patients the facility to view information from their medical record. 

Please ask at Reception about the process of registering to be able to access this facility.

NHS Friends & Family Test

We welcome your feedback and would be really pleased if you can spare a few minutes to complete the new NHS Friends & Family Test. You can find the survey in the 'Have your say' section on the homepage of the website.

Named Accountable GP

From the 1 April 2015, under the terms and conditions of the General Medical Services Contract, the Practice is required to allocate a named, accountable GP to all registered patients.

 

If you wish to know who your allocated GP is, or have a preference as to which GP you are allocated, please contact Reception.

 

These new arrangements do not prevent you making an appointment or seeing any GP at the Practice as patients have always been able to.

 

GP Earnings

From April 2016, all doctors’ practices are required to declare the mean earnings (average pay) for GPs working to deliver NHS services to patients. 

The average pay for GPs working in Dyneley House Surgery in the last financial year was £67,250 before tax and National Insurance.  This is for 2 full time GPs, 8 part time GPs and 0 locum GPs who worked in the practice for more than six months.”

NHS England require that the net earnings of doctors engaged in the Practice are publicised and the required disclosure is shown above. However it should be noted that the prescribed method for calculating earnings is potentially misleading because it takes no account of how much time doctors spend working in the Practice and should not be used to form any judgement about GP earnings, nor to make any comparison with any other practice.

Accessible Information Standard - Making Health & Social Care Information Accessible

The Accessible Information Standard will come into force from 31 July 2016 across health and social care in England. Our aim is to make sure disabled people have access to information that they can understand and any communication support they might need.

You can find out more by reading this guide in easy words and pictures. You can also watch a video in British Sign Language (BSL) or listen to an audio recording.

We are currently working towards the standard.  The first thing we need to do is identify those people with information and communication needs. Please help us to do this.

Let us know if you have a disability, impairment or sensory loss, and the kind of information and communication support that you need.

We will record this on your medical records.  This will help us to be prepared the next time you use our services. Please ask a member of the Practice Team if you need any further information or assistance.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic and Your Information

The ICO recognises the unprecedented challenges the NHS and other health professionals are facing during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

The ICO also recognise that 'Public bodies may require additional collection and sharing of personal data to protect against serious threats to public health.' The Government have also taken action in respect of this and on 20th March 2020 the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care issued a Notice under Regulation 3(4) of The Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002 requiring organisations such as GP Practices to use your information to help GP Practices and other healthcare organisations to respond to and deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.

In order to look after your healthcare needs during this difficult time, we may urgently  need to share your personal information, including medical records, with clinical and non clinical staff who belong to organisations that are permitted to use your information and need to use it to help deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. This could (amongst other measures) consist of either treating you or a member of your family and enable us and other healthcare organisations to monitor the disease, assess risk and manage the spread of the disease. 

Please be assured that we will only share information and health data that is necessary to meet yours and public healthcare needs. The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has also stated that these measures are temporary and will expire on 30th September 2020 unless a further extension is required. Any further extension will be will be provided in writing and we will communicate the same to you.

Please also note that the data protection and electronic communication laws do not stop us from sending public health messages to you, either by phone, text or email as these messages are not direct marketing.

It may also be necessary, where the latest technology allows us to do so, to use your information and health data to facilitate digital consultations and diagnoses and we will always do this with your security in mind. If you are concerned about how your information is being used, please contact our DPO using the contact details available in the GDPR section of our website.

The Practice's Commitment to Information Governance

How the NHS and care services use your information

Dyneley House Surgery is one of many organisations working in the health and care system to improve care for patients and the public.

Whenever you use a health or care service, such as attending Accident & Emergency (A & E) or using Community Care services, important information about you is collected in a patient record for that service. Collecting this information helps to ensure you get the best possible care and treatment.

The information collected about you when you use these services can also be used and provided to other organisations for purposes beyond your individual care, for instance to help with:

 

  • improving the quality and standards of care provided
  • research into the development of new treatments
  • preventing illness and diseases
  • monitoring safety
  • planning services

 

This may only take place when there is a clear legal basis to use this information. All these uses help to provide better health and care for you, your family and future generations. Confidential patient information about your health and care is only used like this where allowed by law.

 

Most of the time, anonymised data is used for research and planning so that you cannot be identified in which case your confidential patient information isn’t needed.

 

You have a choice about whether you want your confidential patient information to be used in this way. If you are happy with this use of information you do not need to do anything. If you do choose to opt out your confidential patient information will still be used to support your individual care.

To find out more or to register your choice to opt out, please visit www.nhs.uk/your-nhs-data-matters. On this web page you will:

  • See what is meant by confidential patient information
  • Find examples of when confidential patient information is used for individual care and examples of when it is used for purposes beyond individual care
  • Find out more about the benefits of sharing data
  • Understand more about who uses the data
  • Find out how your data is protected
  • Be able to access the system to view, set or change your opt-out setting
  • Find the contact telephone number if you want to know any more or to set/change your opt-out by phone
  • See the situations where the opt-out will not apply

 

You can also find out more about how patient information is used at:

https://www.hra.nhs.uk/information-about-patients/ (which covers health and care research); and

https://understandingpatientdata.org.uk/what-you-need-know (which covers how and why patient information is used, the safeguards and how decisions are made)

 

You can change your mind about your choice at any time.

 

Data being used or shared for purposes beyond individual care does not include your data being shared with insurance companies or used for marketing purposes and data would only be used in this way with your specific agreement.

 

Health and care organisations have until 2020 to put systems and processes in place so they can be compliant with the national data opt-out and apply your choice to any confidential patient information they use or share for purposes beyond your individual care. 

Please refer to the Practice's 'privacy notices' for adults and children in the GDPR 'tab' on our website.

 

 

Latest News

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Please book your repeat prescriptions in good time, and only order normal quantities so we have enough supplies for our patients. 

Please do not book a GP appointment or come into the Practice, pharmacy or hospital if you have symptoms of coronavirus.

 

You are advised to stay at home for 7 days if you have either:

 

  1. A high temperature (over 37.8 degrees)
  2. A new continuous cough You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you are staying at home

  1. you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  2. your condition gets worse
  3. your symptoms do not get better after 7 days.
  • Only call NHS 111 if you cannot get help online

    Please send all non-urgent medical enquiries via the e-consultation service, accessible via the Practice's 'home page'.

    Advice for Patients

    Preventing spread of infection

    There are general principles you can follow to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

    • wash your hands often - with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. This is particularly important after taking public transport
    • avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
    • avoid close contact with people who are sick
    • if you feel unwell, stay at home, do not attend work or school
    • cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in a bin. See Catch it, Bin it, Kill it
    • clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces in the home and work environment
    • if you are worried about your symptoms, please call NHS 111. Do not go directly to your GP or other healthcare environment
    • see further information and the Public Health England Blog

    There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 acute respiratory disease. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

    2. Actions on return from China and specified countries and areas

    In addition to China, specified countries are listed in the specified countries and areas.

    2.1 If you have returned from anywhere in Category 1 specified countries and areas in the last 14 days

    If you are currently well:

    • stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with flu viruses. You can find more information about how to do this
    • call NHS 111 to inform them of your recent travel to the area
    • your family do not need to take any precautions or make any changes to their own activities

    If you become unwell:

    • please call NHS 111 immediately in order for you to be assessed by an appropriate specialist in hospital, as quickly as possible
    • follow the home isolation advice sheet

    2.2 If you have returned from Category 2 specified countries and areas in the last 14 days

    If you are well:

    • you do not need to avoid contact with other people
    • your family do not need to take any precautions or make any changes to their own activities

    If you become unwell:

    • stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with other flu viruses.
    • follow this home isolation advice sheet
    • call NHS 111 immediately in order for you to be assessed by an appropriate specialist in hospital, as quickly as possible

    3. Symptoms and what to do

    You should look for any of the following symptoms in the 14 days after the day you return from specified countries and areas:

    • cough
    • difficulty in breathing
    • fever (a temperature of 38 degrees C or higher)

    If you have any of these symptoms, you should:

    • if it is an emergency, call 999 and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days
    • if you are unwell, but it is not an emergency, call NHS 111 and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days

    Whilst you await further advice from NHS 111:

    • avoid contact with others
    • stay at home, do not attend work or school
    • do not travel while sick
    • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing. Throw tissues in the bin
    • wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available

    4. Feeling unwell while away from home

    Do not go to your GP, pharmacy, urgent care centre or a hospital if you become unwell. Instead call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    Whilst you wait for advice from NHS 111 or an ambulance to arrive, try to find somewhere safe to sit where you are away from other people, and avoid touching people, surfaces and objects. Cover your mouth and nose with a disposable tissue when you cough or sneeze and put the tissue in your bag or pocket. then throw the tissue in the bin. If you don’t have any tissues available, cough and sneeze into the crook of your elbow.

    4.1 On public transport

    If you become ill whilst on public transport, stop your journey when you are able to do so and stay where you are and call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    If you become unwell whilst at an airport, bus station or train station before a long journey, seek medical help as above and do not start or continue your journey.

    4.2 In outdoor public spaces

    If you are outside in an open space when you become unwell, stay where you are and call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk). Tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    4.3 Leisure activities

    For example at shops, restaurants, gyms, cinemas, theatres, and sporting events.

    Speak to a member of staff, keeping at least 2 metres distance from them to reduce the risk of spreading infection. Ask them to find a room or area where you can isolate yourself behind a shut door, such as a changing room or staff office. If it’s possible to open a window, do so for ventilation.

    Call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    4.4 Places of worship

    Isolate yourself behind a shut door if there is a room or area available. If it’s possible to open a window, do so for ventilation. If there is nowhere you can isolate yourself, return to your place of residence by the most direct route. Call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    4.5 Educational settings

    Keep 2 metres away from others and if possible find a room or area where you can isolate yourself behind a shut door, such as a staff office or unused classroom. Make sure that children know to tell a teacher if they feel unwell. If it’s possible to open a window, do so for ventilation. If you need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting for medical assistance, use a separate bathroom if available.

    Call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    People who have returned from Category 1 specified countries and areas, in the last 14 days should avoid attending school, work or university. People who have returned from Category 2 specified countries and areas in the last 14 days, are advised to stay at home if they develop symptoms. All other students should continue to attend school or university.

    4.6 At work (non-clinical settings)

    People who have returned from Category 1 specified countries and areas should not attend work for 14 days after their arrival.

    Find a room where you can isolate yourself away from others and shut the door. If it’s possible to open a window, do so for ventilation. If you need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting for medical assistance, use a separate bathroom if available. See below for advice on cleaning workspaces.

    Call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    4.7 With friends and family

    Find a room where you can isolate yourself away from others and shut the door. If it’s possible to open a window, do so for ventilation. If you need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting for medical assistance, use a separate bathroom if available.

    Call NHS 111, or 999 if an emergency (if you are seriously ill or injured or your life is at risk), and tell them which country you have returned from in the last 14 days.

    It is important not to get too close to other people if you become ill - try to maintain 2 metres distance between yourself and others in order to reduce the risk of transmitting infection.

    There are no restrictions for contacts of people who have recently been to Category 2 specified countries and areas and are well.

    If someone is unwell in the household and has recently returned from specified countries and areas, please phone NHS 111 for further advice.

    4.8 Mass gatherings

    If you have returned from Category 1 specified countries and areas, in the last 14 days you should avoid mass gatherings. The risk to the general public attending mass gatherings is very low.

    4.9 Post, packages, take-away food

    The virus does not survive well for long periods outside the body and so it is highly unlikely that COVID-19 can be spread through post or packages.

    It is highly unlikely that COVID-19 can be spread through food.

    5. Cleaning shared spaces

    If a person becomes ill in a shared space, these should be cleaned using disposable cloths and household detergents. Wash your hands after cleaning.

    Further information can be found here for:

    Guidance for households with possible coronavirus infections.

    Guidance on Social Distancing

    Practical ways to help the elderly

    ARE YOU FEELING UNSAFE AT HOME or STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MENTAL HEALTH DURING THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK?

     

    Here are some useful contact details.

     

    National Domestic Violence Helpline: 0808 2000 247 https://www.nationaldahelpline.org.uk/

    NSPCC helpline: 0808 800 5000 If you're worried about a child, even if you're unsure, contact NSPCC professional counsellors for help, advice and support

    Childline 0800 1111: Offers free, confidential advice and support for any child 18 years or under, whatever the worry

    MIND: Mental Health Support with specific advice on ‘Coronavirus and your wellbeing’. www.mind.org.uk

    YoungMinds: Supporting children and young people and their parents/carers with their mental health and wellbeing. Specific advice on managing self-isolation and anxiety about coronavirus. https://youngminds.org.uk

    ICON: Babies cry: You can cope. http://iconcope.org/

    SafeLives: Specific resources for domestic abuse and COVID. http://safelives.org.uk/news-views/domestic- abuse-and-covid-19

    IRISi interventions: irisi.org/iris/find-your-local-iris-site/ 

    The 2019 Patient Survey is now available to view online:

    Patient Survey 2019

    Slippery Conditions Underfoot During the Winter Months

    Please take care when visiting the Surgery as there can be wet leaves and sometimes icy conditions in the car park and on footpaths.

    Flu Clinics 2019

    Appointments are available for flu vaccinations from the 1st October for patients aged over 65 and from the 8th October for all other 'at risk' groups e.g. under 65s, pregnant ladies. Please check if you are eligible and book an appointment as soon as possible by contacting Reception on (01756) 799311 or on-line via www.dyneleyhousesurgery.co.uk.

    Extended Opening Hours from Wednesday 2 October

    New arrangements apply for extended opening hours from Wednesday 2 October.

    The new service will be based in Dyneley Barn (the facility at the bottom of the Surgery car park).

    Appointments will be available with a wide range of healthcare professionals including GPs, Advanced Clinical Practitioners, Practices Nurses, Health Care Assistants, Physiotherapist and telephone consultations with a pharmacist.

    The service will open on a Wednesday and Thursday evening between 18:30 and 20:00 for pre-booked appointments only and for patients to drop off and collect prescriptions.

    Appointments are available on other days at Townhead Surgery Settle, Ilkley Moor Medical Practice and Ling House Medical Centre.

    Please note the Surgery will no longer be open on Saturday morning.

    Appointments on Saturdays and Sundays are available between 08:30 to 10:30 at Silsden Medical Practice. Please ask our Reception team if you would like to book one of these appointments.

    These appointments can be booked in advance or on the same day (Monday – Friday) for a routine medical matter, subject to availability.

     
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